Nissan Now Makes Milk Floats

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By Tim Smith

My first job was as a milkman. I would get up at 4am every Saturday and accompany my xenophobic, chain-smoking boss as we made our way around the local towns and villages delivering milk. It was very rare to deviate from the route.

Typically, when we think of milkman (in the UK, at least) we think of milk ‘floats’. The image that forms in our minds is probably one of the electric float. In the town where I was grown the geography didn’t allow for something so small and underpowered. Internal combustion was the only way to go. But, that could be about to change.

Nissan e-NV200 sans mil

Nissan e-NV200 sans milk

Nissan have announced that they will ‘be the first automaker to have two all-electric vehicles in it’s global line-up’. The first being the Leaf, and now the new e-NV200.

Nissan are claiming a 170km range, with an 80% charge achievable in thirty minutes. ‘If the battery is partially charged’.

Hang on.

What qualifies as partial charge? 2%? 5%? 78%?

Either way, Nissan say that the average daily route length for over half of the companies who use this class of vehicle is just 100km.

This could be a win win for city air quality and noise levels.

Just a couple of points, though. Remember the recent storms that cut power to whole regions for days at a time? Or how about the need to make these things noisier within urban environments so that pedestrians can hear them?

A Nissan e-NV200 with an exhaust posing pouch

A Nissan e-NV200 with an exhaust posing pouch.

 

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